I’VE GOT YOU COVERED

August 10, 2009 at 1:00 am (General, Rebecca York) (, , , , , , , , , )

I’VE GOT YOU COVERED
Sometimes just the author’s name is enough to make a reader reach for the book.  Or it can be the cover art.
I can control the content of my book–by writing the best story I can.  But contrary to what many people think, the writer has little influence over the cover.  Usually I love mine or I hate them.
Here’s my cover for WITCHING MOON, the third book in my Berkley Moon Series.  I’m always looking for suitable occupations for werewolves.  In this story, Adam Marshall has taken a job as the head ranger at a nature park on the edge of a Georgia swamp.  He finds out quickly that the nearby town harbors dark secrets.  And when botanist Sarah Weston comes to the area, powers she’s long suppressed come bubbling to the surface.  When I saw the cover proof, I loved the way Sarah’s image hovers above the swamp.  Then I noticed that one of the pine trees was sticking into her chin, making her look like the bearded lady in a circus sideshow.  When I pointed that out to my editor, the art department blocked out the tree with a green square.   At least they were willing to do it.  When I made a comment about the long dark hair in the heroine’s face in ETERNAL MOON, my editor told me it was there for the suspense element.  Although it’s not as bad as a pine tree goatee, I keep wondering why Renata didn’t reach up and swipe it away.
AMANDA’S CHILD is my story about a pregnant virgin. How did it happen, you ask?  Artificial insemination.  The cover’s actually a concept that I suggested.  And I love the way the hero looks so protective.  But why did they have to make the rocking chair into Mickey Mouse ears?
Another Harlequin Intrigue, CHAIN REACTION, is about a guy who gets caught in an explosion at a research lab and acquires paranormal abilities.  I guess the lightning is supposed to symbolize his powers. But I think the cover shot makes him appear to be walking on a tightrope high up in the air in a thunderstorm.
If the book cover of a romantic suspense novel shows the hero alone, I want that wow factor.  He should be really sexy.  Really good looking.  Really macho.  That’s what will make me reach for the book.
Which is why I think I lucked out with MORE THAN A MAN, my Intrigue out this month.  I love this guy.  (And if you’ve read my previous post about the book, you know I think he looks like my son.)  In my Intrigues, I get to explore all kinds of weird story lines.  In this one, the man who now calls himself Noah Fielding has lived for over 700 years.  Sounds like fun, right?  But his long life creates its own problem.  Like how does he have a relationship with any woman when she’s going to grow old and die–and he won’t.  And what happens when a dying millionaire is desperate to figure out his secret?
I hate to admit that I’ve sometimes bought a book because of the cover art.  How about you? What pulls you in?  And how much do the graphics influence your book purchases?
Rebecca

Sometimes just the author’s name is enough to make a reader reach for the book.  Or it can be the cover art.

I can control the content of my book–by writing the best story I can.  But contrary to what many people think, the writer has little influence over the cover.  Usually I love mine or I hate them.

Witching-125Here’s my cover for WITCHING MOON, the third book in my Berkley Moon Series.  I’m always looking for suitable occupations for werewolves.  In this story, Adam Marshall has taken a job as the head ranger at a nature park on the edge of a Georgia swamp.  He finds out quickly that the nearby town harbors dark secrets.  And when botanist Sarah Weston comes to the area, powers she’s long suppressed come bubbling to the surface.  When I saw the cover proof, I loved the way Sarah’s image hovers above the swamp.  Then I noticed that one of the pine trees was sticking into her chin, making her look like the bearded lady in a circus sideshow.  When I pointed that out to my editor, the art department blocked out the tree with a green square.   At least they were willing to do it.  When I made a comment about the long dark hair in the heroine’s face in EternalMoon-125ETERNAL MOON, my editor told me it was there for the suspense element.  Although it’s not as bad as a pine tree goatee, I keep wondering why Renata didn’t reach up and swipe it away.

amandas-child-125AMANDA’S CHILD is my story about a pregnant virgin. How did it happen, you ask?  Artificial insemination.  The cover’s actually a concept that I suggested.  And I love the way the hero looks so protective.  But why did they have to make the rocking chair into Mickey Mouse ears?

ChainReaction-125Another Harlequin Intrigue, CHAIN REACTION, is about a guy who gets caught in an explosion at a research lab and acquires paranormal abilities.  I guess the lightning is supposed to symbolize his powers. But I think the cover shot makes him appear to be walking on a tightrope high up in the air in a thunderstorm.

If the book cover of a romantic suspense novel shows the hero alone, I want that wow factor.  He should be really sexy.  Really good looking.  Really macho.  That’s what will make me reach for the book.

MoreThanAMan-125Which is why I think I lucked out with MORE THAN A MAN, my Intrigue out this month.  I love this guy.  (And if you’ve read my previous post about the book, you know I think he looks like my son.)  In my Intrigues, I get to explore all kinds of weird story lines.  In this one, the man who now calls himself Noah Fielding has lived for over 700 years.  Sounds like fun, right?  But his long life creates its own problem.  Like how does he have a relationship with any woman when she’s going to grow old and die–and he won’t.  And what happens when a dying millionaire is desperate to figure out his secret?

I hate to admit that I’ve sometimes bought a book because of the cover art.  How about you? What pulls you in?  And how much do the graphics influence your book purchases?

Rebecca

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